Proclamations of Accession of English and British Sovereigns (1547-1952)

Contents

Introduction

"The fact of the accession of the new monarch is published to the nation by a proclamation which is issued as soon as conveniently may be after the death of the former monarch by the lords spiritual and temporal, members of the late monarch's privy Council and the principal gentlement of quality, with the Lord Mayor, aldermen and citizens of London" (Halsbury's Laws of England 4th ed. reissue, 8(2):40).  The proclamation is not made "by the king/queen" as all other proclamations are.  Nowadays, this is one of the exceptions to the principle that proclamations may legally be made and issued only by authority of the Crown (ibid., 8(2):916). Note, however, that a few proclamations were made pursuant to statute: that of George I in 1714 (6 Anne c. 7, s. 10) and that of Queen Victoria in 1837 (1 Will Iv, c. 2, s. 2).

The proclamation itself does not make the sovereign or effect the accession, it merely publicizes the accession, which took place immediately on the death of the reigning monarch by common law.  The proclamation of the new sovereign is a very old tradition, but the idea that an "accession council" makes it dates to the accession of James I in 1603, when the fact that James I was in Scotland required immediate action.  Before that date, the proclamations were made by the sovereign himself.  I have not found any earlier proclamation; although Henry VII's first proclamation as king announced that the duke of Gloucester was dead, it makes no connection between that fact and his own status as king.

The "Usual Solemnities"

To be completed.

Variations in the text

The basic text has changed little, as one can see by comparing the proclamation of 1625 and that of 1952.  The proclamations of 1603, 1660, 1689, and December 1936 stand out for obvious reasons.  The others have the same structure and very similar wording: "Whereas <decease of the previous monarch> we therefore <enumeration of the signers> proclaim and publish <accession of the new monarch> to whom <pledge of loyalty> beseeching <final blessing>."  Nevertheless, some interesting differences appear over time.
  • The phrase "become our only, lawfull, lineall and rightfull liege Lord" loses the adjective "lineal" in 1689.
  • The late monarch's memory is "blessed" the first time, "happy" the second time it is cited; from 1837 it is "blessed and glorious."
  • The crown is called "imperial" in every proclamation except, curiously, that of 1952.
  • The royal style changes appropriately (see the page on British royal styles for details).
  • The phrase "one full voice" becomes "one voice" in 1760.
  • The phrase "God by whom kings do reign" becomes "kings and queens" for Anne in 1702 (but not for Mary in 1689!)

One interesting variation is found in the proclamation of Queen Victoria, "saving the rights of any issue of his late Majesty King William IV. which may be born of his late Majesty's consort." The authority for that variation is as follows. When William IV became king in 1830, he had had two children by his wife Queen Adelaide, but both were dead; the heiress presumptive was the 11-year old Princess Alexandrina Victoria, daughter of the late duke of Kent. Since the British monarchy had no standing provision governing regencies, an act of Parliament was necessary. The Regency Act of 1831, passed in the first year of his reign (1 Will. IV. c. 2), provided in section II that:
"if, at the Demise of his said Majesty leaving her said Majesty him surviving, there shall not be any Child of His said Majesty then living born of Her said Majesty, and Her Royal Highness the Princess Alexandrina Victoria shall be then living, the Privy Council shall forthwith cause Her said Royal Highness the Princess Alexandrina Victoria to be openly and solemnly proclaimed as Sovereign of this Realm in such Manner and Form as the preceding Kings and Queens respectively have been usually proclaimed after the demise of their respective predecessors, but subject to and saving the Rights of any Issue of His said Majesty which may afterwards be born of Her said Majesty; and in every case in which by law an Oath or Declaration or Assurance of Allegience to the Sovereign or asserting the Title of the Sovereign is required to be taken, made, or subscribed there shall be added to such Oath, Declaration, and Assurance the words following -- 'Saving the Rights of any Issue of His late Majesty King William the Fourth, which may be born of His late Majesty's Consort;' which Addition shall be continued until Parliament shall otherwise order."
The Act also provided that, should William IV die without children before Victoria turned 18, her mother the duchess of Kent would be regent; should a child then be born to Queen Adelaide, a demise of the crown would occur, the child would accede as if Victoria had died and be proclaimed forthwith, and Queen Adelaide would become regent (see more details in a post by Don Aitken).

The proclamation of 1952 varies quite a bit more than the usual.  The style now includes "Head of the Commonwealth", and the list of proclaimers now includes "representatives of the members of the Commonwealth"; "we do acknowledge" becomes "her lieges acknowledge"; " become our only lawful and rightful Liege Lord/Lady" is now "become Queen".  The crown which is come to the princess is unspecified.  Most strikingly, the style under which she is proclaimed, "Queen of this Realm and of all Her other Realms and Territories [...]" was not the correct royal style (which was the same as that of her father's accession, with "Emperor of India" omitted).  This is probably due to the fact that "Ireland" was unseemly since the proclamation of the Republic in 1949, but the style had not yet been officially altered (it would only be in May 1953, more than a year after the accession). Note, however, that in Canada Elizabeth II was proclaimed "our only lawful and rightful Liege Lady Elizabeth the Second by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland and the British Dominions beyond the Seas QUEEN, Defender of the Faith, Supreme Liege Lady in and over Canada"; she was also proclaimed queen of Ireland in South Africa (see May: The South African Constitution, 3rd ed., Juta, Cape Town 1955, p. 164 ; I thank Greg Taylor for pointing out both instances).

I include two Scottish proclamations I have found, one for James VII (1685) and one for George I (1714).  The striking differences between the two reflect the union of the two kingdoms in the meantime.  I also include an Irish proclamation for George I (1714), out of curiosity.  (The proclamation immediately following in the London Gazette on that day calls for disarming papists and confiscating their horses!).   The London Gazette also published the Irish proclamation of George II.

Sources

After 1666, the Gazette becomes the official source for proclamations, and I have drawn from it as much as possible.  The introductory paragraph in the Gazette becomes shorter and stylized over time, as the Gazette became less a news outlet and more a journal of record.  By 1952, the paragraph has lost all specifics about the late monarch's demise (which were quite lengthy in the 17th c., and I have at times abridged them), and dropped the laudatory couplet about his or her virtues (rather perfunctory since William IV anyway).  The paragraph is missing for the January 1936 because the Times provided the text of the proclamation as part of its description of the ceremonies.  I have not included the signatures appended to the proclamations, because the sources do not always give them, and the signatures become quite numerous over time.


Edward VI (1547)

(Source: Paul H. Hughes and James L. Larkin: Tudor Royal Proclamations. New Haven, 1964-69: Yale University Press. proclamation 275. vol. 1, p. 381.)

[Westminster, 31 January 1547]

EDWARD VI, by the grace of God King of England, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith and of the Church of England and also of Ireland in earth the supreme head, to all our most loving, faithful, and obedient subjects, and to every of them, greeting.

Where it hath pleased Almighty God, on Friday last past in the morning to call unto his infinite mercy the most excellent high and mighty prince, King Henry VIII of most noble and famous memory, our most dear and entirely beloved father, whose soul God pardon; forasmuch as we, being his only son and undoubted heir, be now invested and established in the crown imperial of this realm, and other his realms, dominions, and countries, with all regalities, pre-eminences, styles, names, titles, and dignities to the same belonging or in any wise appertaining:

We do by these presents signify unto all our said most loving, faithful, and obedient subjects that like as we for our part shall, by God's grace, show ourself a most gracious and benign sovereign lord to all our good subjects in all their just and lawful suits and causes, so we mistrust not but they and every of them will again, for their parts, at all times and in all cases, show themselves unto us, their natural liege lord, most faithful, loving, and obedient subjects, according to their bounden duties and allegiances, whereby they shall please God and do the thing that shall tend to their own preservations and sureties; willing and commanding all men of all estates, degrees, and conditions to see our peace kept and to be obedient to our laws, as they tender our favor and will answer for the contrary at their extreme peril.

Mary (1553)

(Source: Paul H. Hughes and James L. Larkin: Tudor Royal Proclamations. New Haven, 1964-69: Yale University Press. proclamation 388. vol. 2, p. 3.)

[Note: Mary was proclaimed in Norfolk and Suffolk on 11 July, Bury on 12 July, Norwich on 13 July; London on 19 July at Cheapside Cross and other accustomed places in the city.]

[London, 19 July 1553]

MARY BY THE GRACE OF GOD Queen of England, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, and in the earth supreme head of the Church of England and Ireland: to all our most loving, faithful, and obedient subjects, greeting.

Forasmuch as it hath pleased Almighty God to call unto his mercy the most excellent Prince, King Edward VI, our late brother of most worthy memory, whereby the crown imperial of the realms of England and Ireland, with the title of France and all other things appertaining unto the same, do most rightfully and lawfully belong unto us:

We do signify unto you that according to our said right and title we do take upon us and be in the just and lawful possession of the same; not doubting but that all our true and faithful subjects will so accept us, take us, and obey us as their natural and liege sovereign lady and Queen, according to the duties of their allegiance; assuring all our good and faithful subjects that in the' their so doing they shall find us their benign and gracious sovereign lady, as others our most noble progenitors have heretofore been.

Elizabeth I (1558)

(Source: Paul H. Hughes and James L. Larkin: Tudor Royal Proclamations. New Haven, 1964-69: Yale University Press. proclamation 448. vol. 2, p. 99.)

[Westminster, 17 November 1558]

ELIZABETH by the grace of God Queen of England, France, and Ireland, defender of the faith, etc. Because it hath pleased Almighty God by calling to his mercy out of this mortal life, to our great grief, our dearest sister of noble memory, Mary, late Queen of England, France, and Ireland (whose soul God have), to dispose and bestow upon us as the only right heir by blood and lawful succession the crown of the foresaid kingdoms of England, France, and Ireland, with all manner titles and rights thereunto in anywise appertaining:

We do publish and give knowledge by this our proclamation to all manner people being natural subjects of every the said kingdoms, that from the beginning of the 17th day of this month of November, at which time our said dearest sister departed from this mortal life, they be discharged of all bonds and duties of subjection towards our said sister, and be from the same time in nature and law bound only to us as to their only sovereign lady and Queen: wherewith we do by this our proclamation straightly charge and ally them to us, promising on our part no less love and care towards their preservation than hath been in any of our progenitors, and not doubting on their part but they will observe the duty which belongeth to natural, good, and true loving subjects.

And further we straightly charge and command all manner our said subjects of every degree, to keep themselves in our peace, and not to attempt upon any pretense the breach, alteration, or change of any order or usage presently established within this our realm; upon pain of our indignation and the perils and punishment which thereto in anywise may belong.

James VI and I (1603)

(Source: Larkin and Hughes: Royal Stuart Proclamations. Oxford, 1973: Oxford University Press. vol. 1, p. 1.)

By the King.

A Proclamation, declaring the undoubted Right of our Soveraigne Lord King JAMES, to the Crowne of the Realmes of England, Fraunce and Ireland.

[London 24 March 1603]

FORASMUCH as it hath pleased Almighty God to call to his mercy out of this transitory life our Soveraigne Ladie, the High and Mightie Prince, Elizabeth late Queene of England, France, and Ireland, by whose death and dissolution, the Imperiall Crowne of these Realmes aforesaid are now absolutely, wholly, and solely come to the High and Mightie Prince, James the sixt King of Scotland, who is lineally and lawfully descended from the body of Margaret, daughter to the High and Renowmed Prince, Henrie the seventh King of England, France, and Ireland, his great Grandfather, the said Lady Margaret being lawfully begotten of the body of Elizabeth, daughter to King Edward the fourth (by which happy conjunction both the houses of Yorke and Lancaster were united, to the joy unspeakeable of this Kingdome, formerly rent & torne by the long dissention of bloody and Civil Warres) the same Lady Margaret being also the eldest sister of Henry the eight, of famous memorie King of England as aforesayd:

We therefore the Lords Spirituall and Temporall of this Realme, being here assembled, united, and assisted with those of her late Majesties Privie Counsell, and with great numbers of other principall Gentlemen of quality in the Kingdome, with the Lorde Maior, Aldermen, and Citizens of London, and a multitude of other good Subjects and Commons of this Realme, thirsting now after nothing so much as to make it knowen to all persons, who it is that by Law, by Lineall succession, and undoubted Right is now become the onely Soveraigne Lord and King of these Imperiall Crownes (to the intent that by vertue of his Power, Wisedome and Godly Courage, all things may be provided for, and executed, which may prevent or resist either forreine attempts, or popular disorder, tending to the breach of the present Peace, or to the prejudice of his Majesties future quiet) doe now hereby with one full Voyce and Consent of Tongue and Heart, publish and proclaime, That the High and Mightie Prince, James the sixt King of Scotland, is now by the death of our late Soveraigne, Queene of England of famous memorie, become also our Onely, Lawfull, Lineall and Rightfull Liege Lord, James the first, King of England, France and Ireland, defender of the faith, to whome as to our onely just Prince, adorned (besides his undoubted Right) with all the rarest gifts of mind and bodie, to the infinite comfort of all his people and Subjects that shall live under him, we doe acknowledge all faith and constant obedience, with all heartie and humble affections, both during our naturall lives for our selves, and in the behalfe of our posteritie. Hereby protesting and denouncing to all persons whatsoever, that in this just and lawfull Acte of ours, we are resolved by the favor of Gods holy assistance, and in the zeale of our owne Conscience (warranted by certaine knowledge of his manifest and undoubted Right, as hath beene sayd before) to maintaine and uphold his Majesties person and Estate, as our onely undoubted Soveraigne Lord and King, with the Sacrifice of our Lives, Lands, Goods, Friends, and Adherents, against all power, force, or practise, that shall goe about by word or deed, to interrupt, contradict, or impugne his just Claymes, his entry into this Kingdome, or any part thereof, at his good pleasure, or disobey such Royall directions as shall come from him. To all which wee are resolved onely to yeeld our selves, untill the last drop of our bloods be spent for his service. Hereby willing and commanding, in the name of our Soveraigne Lord James the first, King of al the foresaid kingdoms, all the late Lieutenants, deputy Lieutenants, Sheriffes, justices, & all Maiors, Bailiffes, Constables, Headboroughes, and all other Officers and Ministers whatsoever, that they bee ayding and assisting from time to time in all things that are or shalbe necessary for the preventing, resisting, and suppressing of any disorderly assemblies, or other unlawfull Acte or Attempt, either in word or deede, against the publique peace of the Realme, or any way prejudiciall to the Right, Honour, State or Person, of our only undoubted and deere Lord and Soveraigne that now is, James the first King of all the said Kingdomes, as they will avoid the perill of his Majesties heavie indignation, and their owne utter ruine and confusion. Beseeching God to blesse his Majestic and his Royall posteritie with long and happy yeeres to raigne over us.

God save King James.

[signatures]


Charles I (1625)

(Source: Acts of the Privy Council of England. Vol. 40, p. 5.)

[Whitehall, 27 March 1625]

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to His mercy our late Soveraigne Lord King James, of blessed memory, by whose decease the imperiall crownes of Great Brittaine, France and Ireland are solely and rightfully come to the high and mighty Prince Charles, we therefore, the Lords spirituall and temporall of the realme, being heere assisted with those of His late Majestic's Privy. Councell, with number of other principal gentlemen of qualitye, with the Lord Maior, Aldermen and citizens of London doe now heereby with one full voyce and consent of tongue and hearte publish and proclayme that the high and mightie Prince Charles is now by the death of our late Soveraigne, of happy memory, become our only, lawfull, lineall and rightfull liege Lord Charles, by the Grace of God, King of Great Brittaine, France and Ireland, Defend of the Faith etc., to whome wee doe acknowledge all faith and constant obedience with all harty and humble affeccion, beseeching God by whome Kinges doe raigne to blesse the royall King Charles with long and happy yeares to raigne over us.

God save King Charles.


Charles II (1649 and 1660)

Note: Charles II had been recognized by royalists as successor to his father from the latter's death on 31 Jan 1649, and the following proclamation was published in London.

(Baker, Richard, Sir, 1568-1645.  Title: A chronicle of the kings of England . 1660. p. 508.)

We, the Noblemen, Judges, Knights, Lawyers, Gentlemen, Freeholders, Merchants, Citizens, Yeomen, Seamen, and other Freemen of England, Do according to our Allegieance and Covenant by these Presents, Heartily, Joyfully, and Unanimously, Acknowledge and Proclaim the Illustrious CHARLES, Prince of Wales, next Heir to his Father King Charles (whose late Wicked Murther, and all Consenters thereunto, We from our Souls Abominate) to be Hereditary Birth-Right, and Lawfull Successor, rightfull and undoubted King of Great Britain &c. And that We shall constantly and Sincerely in our severall Places and Callings, Defend and Maintain his Royall Person, Crown, and Dignity, with our Estates and Lives, against all Opposers, whom hereby We Declare to be Enemies to his Majesty and Kingdomes: In Testimony whereof, we have caused these to be Publisht throughout all Counties and Corporations of this Realm, The First Day of February, in the First Year of his Majesties Reign.

He was also proclaimed at Mercat Cross in Edinburgh on 5 Feb 1649 (Sir James Balfour: Annals of Scotland, in Historical Works, Edinburgh:, W. Aitkinson, 1824; 3:387: "Prince Charles proclaimde King of Grate Brittane, France and Irland, at Edinburghe Crosse, by Illa and Snaudon, herauldes; the Lord Chanceler, Loudon, in black veluet goune, read the proclamatione: he was assisted by all the members of -- upone Monday, the 5th of Februarij, 1649").  The text follows:

(Ayloffe, Joseph, Sir. Calendars of the ancient charters, &c. and of the Welch and Scotish rolls, now remaining in the Tower of London. London, 1772. p. 409-410.)

FORASMUCH as the late king is removed by a violent death, and that there is left a lawfull successor, CHARLES prince of Scotland and Wales, &c. now king of Great Britaine; France, and Ireland, Wee the estates of parliament of the kingdome of Scotland, Wee therefore doe hereby proclaime to all the world, That the said prince CHARLES is king of Great Britaine, France, and Ireland, &c.. And because his majesty is bound by the fundamentall lawes of this kingdome to rule in righteousnesse and equity, for the honour of God, the good of religion, and the wealth of his people, it is therefore declared, that before his exercise of his royall dignity he shall  give satisfaction for his security of religion, the union betwixt the kingdomes, and the peace of this kingdome, according to the nationall covenant, and the solemne league and covenant; for which end wee are resolved to make our speedy and humble addresse to his majesty. And in witness hereof, we the parliament of Scotland publish this our acknowledgement of his right and succession to the crowne of these kingdomes, solemnely att the Mercate crosse of Edinburgh; and ordaine his name and seale to be used in the judicatores, and his portrait in the mynthouse of the kingdome; and command this act to be proclaimed and printed.

Followes the tenor of the instruments taken be his majestie's advocate upon the proclamation of the above-written proclamation upon the crosse of Edinburgh, on the 5th day of February 1649, at twelve houres in the day, or thereby.

The ylk day compeired personally upon the place aforesaid, Sir Archibald Jhonston of Wariston, knight, his majestie's advocate, &c.and after reading of the proclamation whereby CHARLES the Second is proclaimed king of Great Britaine, France, and Ireland, and asked instruments of mee Sir William Scott of Clarkington, knight, clarke of parliament (in whose hands the said instruments were ordayned be the parliament to be taken) upon reading of the proclamation foresaid ; and that the said Charles the Second was proclaimed king of Great Britaine, France, and Ireland. These things were done day, yeare, and place respective foresayd, before these witnesses, John earle of Loudoun, &c. In witnes whereof my subscription manuall is hereto subjoined.   Sic subscribitur,
W.SCOTT, Cls.ParL

Nevertheless, at the time of the Restoration the following document was issued.

(David C. Douglas, ed.: English Historical Documents. New York: Oxford University Press.  Vol. 8, p. 58.  Citing Journal of the House of Lords, XI, p. 19).

A PROCLAMATION OF BOTH HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT FOR PROCLAIMING OF HIS MAJESTY KING OF ENGLAND, SCOTLAND, FRANCE AND IRELAND DEFENDER OF THE FAITH, &C.

Although it can no way be doubted but that his Majesty's right and title to his crowns and kingdoms is and was every way completed by the death of his most royal father of glorious memory, without the ceremony or solemnity of a proclamation, yet since proclamations in such cases have been always used, to the end that all good subjects might upon this occasion testify their duty and respects, and since the armed violence and other the calamities of these many years last past have hitherto deprived us of any such opportunity wherein we might express our loyalty and allegiance to his Majesty, we, therefore, the Lords and Commons now assembled in Parliament, together with the lord mayor, aldermen and commons of the city of London and other freemen of this kingdom now present, do, according to our duty and allegiance, heartily, joyfully and unanimously acknowledge and proclaim that immediately upon the decease of our late Sovereign Lord King Charles the imperial crown of the realm of England, and of all the kingdoms, dominions and rights belonging to the same, did by inheritance, birthright and lawful and undoubted succession descend and come to his most excellent Majesty Charles the Second, as being lineally, justly and lawfully next heir of the blood royal of this realm, and that by the goodness and providence of Almighty God he is of England, Scotland, France and Ireland the most potent, mighty and undoubted king, Defender of the Faith, &c. And thereunto we most humbly and faithfully do submit and oblige ourselves, our heirs and posterities for ever.

Dated the 8th day of May 1660.


James VII and II (1685)


London Gazette, number 2006, Feb. 5-9 1684 (o.s.)

Whitehall, February 6. 1684.

On Monday last in the Morning our late Gracious Soveraign King Charles the Second was seized with a violent Fit, by which his Speech and Senses were for some time taken from him, but upon the immediate application of fitting Remedies He returned to such a condition as gave some hopes of His Recovery till Wednesday night, at which time the Disease returning upon him with greater violence, He expired this dayt about Noon.  Upon which the Privy-Council Assembling, his present Majesty made a most Gracious Declaration to them, and caused all the Lords and others of his late Majesty's Privy-Council that were then present to be Sworn of His privy-Council; and ordered a Proclamation to be published, signifying His Majesty's Plreasure, That all Men being in Office of Government at the Decease of the late King, shall so continue till His Majesty's farther direction. And in the Afternoon the King was Proclaimed before Whitehall-Gate, at Temple-Bar, and the Royal-Exchange, with the usual Solemnity.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to his Mercy our late Soveraign Lord King Charles the Second of Blessed Memory, by whose Decease the Imperial Crowns of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, are solely and rightfully come to the High and Mighty Prince James, Duke of York and Albany, His said late Majesties only Brother and Heir, We therefore the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being here assisted with those of His late Majesties Privy-Council, with numbers of other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, with the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of London, do now hereby with one full voice and Consent of Tongue and Heart, Publish and Proclaim, That the High and Mighty Prince James the Second, is now by the death of our late Soveraign of Happy Memory, become our only Lawful, Lineal, and Rightful Liege Lord, James the Second, by the Grace of God King of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c. To whom we do acknowledge all Faith and constant Obedience, with all hearty and humble Affection: Beseeching God by whom Kings do Reign, to Bless the Royal King James the Second with long and happy years to Reign over us.

God Save King JAMES the Second.



London Gazette, number 2009, Feb. 16-19 1684 (o.s.)

Edinburgh, February 10.

A Publication of the Royal Authority of the most Serene, most Mighty, and most August Monarch, JAMES the Seventh, by the Grace of God, King of Scotland, England, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c.

The Earl of Perth, Lord High Chancellor.
The Lord Arch-Bishop of St. Andrews.
The Duke of Queensberry, L. High Treasurer.
The Lord Arch-Bishop of Glasgow.
The Lord Marquis of Athol, Lord Privy-Seal.
The Lord Duke of Hamilton.
The Lord Marquis of Douglas.
The Earl of Drumlanrig.
The Earl of Wintoun.
The Earl of Linlithgow, Lord Justice-General.
The Earl of Southesk.
The Earl of Panmure.
The Earl of Tweedale.
The Earl of Balcarras.
The Lord Yester.,
The Lord Kinnaird.
L. President of the Session.
L. Register.
L. Advocat.
L. Justice Clerk.
L. Gastlehill.
General Lieutenant Drummond.
Drumelzeer.
Abbotshall.Colonel Graham of Claver-House.
Gossfoord.

Forasmuch as it hath pleased the Almighty God, to call Charles the Second, Our late Sovereign Lord, of Glorious and ever Blessed Memory, from a Temporary Crown, to Inherit an Eternal in the Heavens; Whereby the undoubted Right of Succession, to Him, in the Imperial Crown of This Realm, was immediately Devolved on the Sacred Person of His Royal and Dearest Brother, Our present Sacred Soveraign (whom God long preserve.)  Therefore We, the Lords of His Majesties Privy-Council, Authorized in that Capacity by His Majesties Royal Letter, bearing Date at Whitehall, the Sixth day of February Instant, Do, with the Concurrence of Several other Lords, Spiritual, and Temporal, Barons, and Burgesses of this Realm, Hereby Declare, and Proclaim to all the World, That Our Soveraign Lord JAMES the Seventh, is by Lawful and undoubted Succession and Descent, KING of Scotland, England, France and Ireland, and the Dominions there-unto belonging, Defender of the Faith, &c. (Whom God preserve and Bless with a Long, Glorious, Happy Life and Prosperous Reign).  And whom We shall humbly Obey, Dutifully and Faithfully Serve, Maintain and Defend, with Our Lives and Fortunes against all Deadly, as Our only Righteous King and Soveraign, over all Persons, and in all Causes, as Holding His Imperial Crown from God alone.  And for Testification whereof, We here, in presence of the Almighty God, and a great number of His Majesties Faithful People, of all Estates and Qualities, who are assisting with Us, at this Solemn Publication of Our Due, Humble and Faithful Acknowledgement of His Supreme Soveraign Authority, at the Mercat Cross of the City of Edinburgh, Declare and Publish, That Our said Soveraign Lord, by the Goodness and Providence of Almighty God, is of Scotland, England, France and Ireland, and Dominions there-unto belonging, the most Potent, Mighty, and undoubted KING.  And hereby give our Oaths, with up-lifted Hands, that We shall bear True and Faithful Allegiance, unto Our said Sacred Soveraign, JAMES the Seventh; king of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c. And to His Lawful Heirs and Successors, and shall perform all Duties, Service, and Obedience to him, as becomes His Faithful, Loyal, and Dutiful Subjects. So help Us God.

Per actum Dominorum Secreti Concilii.  Will. Paterson, Cls. Sti. Concilii.

God save King JAMES the Seventh.
 

William and Mary (1689)

London Gazette, Feb. 11-14, 1688 (o.s.).  The text of the Proclamation is from Parliamentary History of England, vol. 5,  p. 113.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God in his great mercy to this kingdom, to vouchsafe us a miraculous Deliverance from Popery and Arbitrary Power; and that our preservation is due, next under God, to the resolution and the conduct of His highness the Prince of Orange, whom God hath chosen to be the glorious instrument of such an inestimable happiness to us and our posterity: and being highly sensible, and fully persuaded of the great and eminent virtue of her highness the Princess of Orange, whose zeal for the Protestant Religion will, no doubt, bring a blessing along with her upon this nation: and Whereas the lords and commons now assembled at Westminster, have made a Declaration , and presented the same to the said Prince and Princess of Orange, and therein desired them to accept the Crown, who have accepted the same accordingly; We therefore the lords spiritual and temporal, and commons, together with the lord-mayor and citizens of London, and others of the commons of this realm, do with full consent publish and proclaim, according to the said Declaration, William and Mary, Prince and Princess of Orange, to be King and Queen of England, France and Ireland, with all the dominions and territories thereunto belonging; who are accordingly so to be owned, deemed and taken, by all the people of the aforesaid realms and dominions who are from henceforth bound to acknowledge and pay unto them all faith and true allegiance; beseeching God, by whom kings reign, to bless King William and Queen Mary, with long and happy years to reign over us.
 

Anne (1702)

London Gazette, number 3790, March 5-9 1701 (o.s.).

St. James's, March 8.  On Wednesday last Our late Most Gracious Sovereign King William the Third was seized with an Ague Fit and a Feaver […] His Majesty expired at Kensington at Eight a Clock this Morning; whereupon the Lords of the Privy Council assembling together at St. James's, Her present Majesty made a most Gracious Declaration to them, and caused all the Lords and others of the late King's Privy Council, who were present, to be Sworn of Her Majesty's Privy Council; And Ordered a Proclamation to be published, signifying her Majesty's Pleasure, That all Persons in Office of Government at the decease of the late King, shall so continue till her Majesty's farther Directions; And in the Afternoon the Queen was Proclaimed before the Gate of Her Palace at St. James's, at Charing-Cross, Temple-Bar, and the Royal Exchange, with the usual Solemnity.

Whereas it has pleased Almighty God to call to His Mercy Our late Sovereign Lord King William the Third of Blessed Memory, by whose Decease, the Imperial Crowns of England, Scotland, France, and Ireland, are Solely and Rightfully come to the High and Mighty Princess Anne of Denmark; We therefore, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being here assisted with those of His late Majesty's Privy Council, with numbers of other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, with the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of London, do now hereby with One full Voice and Consent of Tongue and Heart, Publish and Proclaim, That the High and Mighty Princess ANNE is now by the death of our late Sovereign, of Happy Memory, become our only Lawful and Rightful Liege Lady Anne, by the Grace of God, Queen of England, Scotland, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c. To whom we do acknowledge all Faith and Constant Obedience, with all hearty and humble Affection: Beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do Reign, to Bless the Royal Queen Anne with long and happy years to Reign over us.

Given at the Court at St. James's, the Eighth Day of March, 1701.

God Save Queen ANNE.
 

George I (1714)

London Gazette, number 5247, July 31-Aug 3. 1714.

London, August. 1.

This Day, at half an Hour past Seven in the Morning, died our late most Gracious Sovereign Queen Anne, in the Fiftieth Year of her Age, and the Thirteenth of Her Reign; a Princess of exemplary Piety and Virtue.  [...]  Upon Her Death the Lords of the Privy-Council immediately assembled at St. James's, and gave Orders for Proclaiming the Most High and Mighty Prince George Elector of Brunswick-Lunenburg, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, &c. His Majesty was accordingly proclaimed with the usual Solemnity before the Gate of His Palace at St. James's, at Charing-Cross, at Temple-Bar, at the End of Woodstreet in Cheapside, and lastly at the Royal Exchange.  Great Numbers of the Nobility and Principal Gentry assisted at each Proclamation, and attended in their Coaches during the whole Solemnity.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to His Mercy our late Sovereign Lady Queen Anne, of Blessed Memory, by whose Decease the Imperial Crowns of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, are Solely and Rightfully come to the High and Mighty Prince George Elector of Brunswick-Lunenburg: We therefore the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the Realm, being here Assisted with those of Her late Majesties Privy-Council, with numbers of other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, with the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of London, do now hereby, with one full voice and Consent of Tongue and Heart, Publish and Proclaim, That the High and Mighty Prince George Elector of Brunswick-Lunenburg, is now by the Death of our late Sovereign, of Happy Memory, become our only Lawful and Rightful Liege Lord, George, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c. To whom we do Acknowledge all Faith and constant Obedience, with all hearty and humble Affection: Beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do Reign, to Bless the Royal King George with Long and Happy Years to Reign over us.

Given at the Palace of St. James's, the First Day of August, 1714.

God Save the KING.



London Gazette, number 5249, Aug 7-Aug. 10. 1714.

Edinburgh, August 5.

An Express having brought the News of the Decease of our late Sovereign Lady Queen Anne, of blessed Memory; the High and Mighty Prince George, Elector of Brunswick-Lunenburg, was this Day Proclaimed at the Market-Cross of this City, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland.  At which Ceremony assisted a great many of the Nobility and Gentry of this Country, who happen'd to be in Town.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty GOD, to call to His Mercy our late Sovereign Lady Queen Anne, of Blessed Memory; by whose decease the Imperial Crowns of Great Britain, France and Ireland, are Solely and Rightfully come to the High and Might Prince George Elector of Brunswick-Lunenburg: And whereas the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the Realm, Assisted with those of Her late Majesty's Privy-Council, with Numbers of other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, with the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of London, did by a Proclamation, given at St. James's the First Day of August One Thousand Seven Hundred and Fourteen, Publish and Proclaim, That the High and Mighty Prince George Elector of Brunswick-Lunenburg, is now, by the Death of our late Sovereign, of Happy Memory, become our only Lawful and Rightful Liege and Lord, George, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c.  And whereas, in Obedience to an Order of the Lords of His Majesty's most Honourable Privy-Council, a Copy of the said Proclamation has been sent, to the Lord Provost of Edinburgh, in Order to Proclaim his Royal Majesty; Therefore, We the Lord Provost, Magistrates and Town Council of Edinburgh; being Assisted with Numbers of Noblemen and other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, do now, with one full Voice and Consent of Tongue and Heart, Publish and Proclaim, That the High and  Mighty Prince George, Elector of Brunswick-Lunenburg, is now, by the Death of our late Sovereign, of Happy Memory, become our only Lawful and Rightful Liege Lord, George, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c. To whom we do Acknowledge all Faith and constant Obedience, with all hearty and humble Affection: Beseeching GOD, by whom Kings and Queens do Reign, to Bless the Royal King George with Long and Happy Years to Reign over us.

God save the KING.



London Gazette, number 5251, Aug 14-Aug. 17.  1714.

Dublin-Castle, August 7.  Yesterday in the Afternoon the Lords Justices received by Express a Letter from the Lord of the most Honourable the privy Council of Great Britain, with an account of Her late Majesty's Death, and Directions for proclaiming the King. Upon the receipt of this Letter their Excellencies and the Council met immediately and signed a Proclamation, pursuant to that which had been issued to the same Effect in Great Britain; and about Seven of the Clock the same Evening the Lords Justices, and all the Lords Spiritual and Temporal now in Town, with the Lord Mayor and Aldermen, other Officers attending the State,m went through the City and Proclaimed His Majesty at the usual Places with great Solemnity.  After which they returned to the Castle, and the great Guns fired three Rounds, which were answered by Volleys of Small-Shot from the Regiments drawn up un College-Green; and in the Evening there were Bonfires throughout the whole city.
The Lords Justices and Council have sent Directions for Priclaiming His Majesty in all the Cities and Towns of this Kingdom, and have also issued a Proclamation for Disarming the Papists, and Seizing their Horses.

By the Lords Justices and Council of Ireland,

A Proclamation,

Tho. Armag, Con. Phipps, Canc.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to Call to His Mercy our late Sovereign Lady Queen Anne, of Blessed Memory, by whose Decease the Imperial Crowns of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, are Solely and Rightfully come to the High and Mighty Prince George, Elector of Brunswick-Lunenburg: We the Lords Justices of this Kingdom, and several of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being Assisted with those of Her late Majesty's Privy-Council, and Numbers of other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, with the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of Dublin, do now hereby, with one full Voice and Consent of Tongue and Heart, Publish and Proclaim, That the High and Mighty Prince George, Elector of Brunswick-Lunenburg, is now by the Death of our late Sovereign, of Happy Memory, become our only Lawful and Rightful Liege Lord, George, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c. To whom we do Acknowledge all Faith and constant Obedience, with all hearty and humble Affection: Beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do Reign, to Bless the Royal King George with Long and Happy Years to Reign over us.  And we do by this Our Royal Proclamation think fit to give publick Notice hereof to all His Majesty's Subjects, and do require all Mayors, Sheriffs, and other His Majesty's Officers, to cause the same to be Proclaimed in all the Cities and Towns Corporate, and Market Towns of this Kingdom, and all Officers both Civil and Military, and other His Majesty's Subjects, are to be Assisting in the Performance hereof, with all due Solemnity.

Given at the Council-Chamber in Dublin-Castle, the Sixth Day of August, 1714.

Will. Dublin, Kildare, Abercorn, W. Kildare, Shelburne, Cha. Feilding, P. Savage, Wm. Steuart, Tho. Knightly, Sam. Dopping.

 God save the KING.


George II (1727)


London Gazette, number 6590, June 13-17, 1727

Whitehall, June 15.  Yesterday in the Afternoon arrived a Messenger, with an Account, that our late most Gracious Sovereign King George was seized with a sudden Illness, on the 9th Instant, as he was in his Coach, between Delden and Nordhorn, on his Way to Hanover; His Majesty was presently let Blood, and had such Remedies as were judged proper administered to him; and travelled on to his Highness the Duke of York's at Osnabrug, where he arrived about Ten that Night: But notwithstanding all the Physicians could do for his Recovery, he departed this Life the 11th, about One in the Morning, in the 68th Year of His Age, and the 13th of His Reign: A Prince endowed with all Royal Virtues.
Whereupon the Lords of the Privy Council assembling at Leicester-House, gave Order for proclaiming His present Majesty, who made a most gracious Declaration to them, and caused all the Lords and others of the late King's Privy Council to be Sworn of His Majesty's Privy Council: And this Morning about Ten a-Clock His Majesty was proclaimed: first, in the Court before Leicester-House, where the Officers of State, Nobility, and Privy Counsellors were present, with the Officers of Arms, all being on Foot, then the Officers of Arms being mounted on Horseback, the like was done in Leicester-Square, at Charing-Cross, within Temple-Bar, at the end of Wood-Street in Cheapside, and lastly at the Royal Exchange, with the usual Solemnities: The principal Officers of State, a great Number of the Nobility, and of other Persons of Distinction, attending during the whole Ceremony.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to His Mercy our late Sovereign Lord King George of Blessed Memory, by whose Decease the Imperial Crowns of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, are Solely and Rightfully come to the High and Mighty Prince George, Prince of Wales; We therefore the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being here Assisted with those of His late Majesty's Privy Council, with numbers of other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, with the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of London, do now hereby, with one full Voice and Consent of Tongue and Heart, Publish and Proclaim, That the High and Mighty Prince George, Prince of Wales, is now, by the Death of our late Sovereign, of happy Memory, become Our only lawful and rightful Liege Lord, George the Second, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c: To whom we do Acknowledge all Faith and constant Obedience, with all hearty and humble Affection: Beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do Reign, to Bless the Royal King George the Second with long and happy Years to Reign over us.

Given at the Court at Leicester-House, this 14th Day of June, 1727.

God Save the King.


George III (1760)

London Gazette, October 21-26, 1760

Whitehall, October 26, 1760.  Yesterday in the Morning, between the Hours of Seven and Eight, Our late Most Gracious Sovereign King George the Second was suddenly seized, at his Palace at Kensington, by a violent Disorder, and fell down speechless, and soon expired, notwithstanding all possible Methods used for His Recovery.,  His Majesty departed this Life in the 77th Year of His Age, and the 34th of His Reign; Beloved, Honoured, and Regretted by His Subjects for His Eminent and Royal Virtues.
Whereupon the Lords of the Privy Council assembling at Carleton House, gave Order for Proclaiming His present Majesty, who made a most gracious Declaration to them, and caused all the Lords and others of the late King's Privy Council, to be sworn of His Majesty's Privy Council.
And this Day, about Noon, His Majesty was proclaimed, first before Saville-House, where the Officers of State, Nobility and Privy Counsellors, were present, with the Officers of Arms, all being on Foot: Then the Officers of Arms, being mounted on Horseback, the like was done at Charing-Cross; within Temple-Bart at the End of Wood-Street in Cheapside; and lastly, at the Royal Exchange, with the usual Solemnities; the Princiapl Officers of State, a great Number of the Nobility, and of other Persons of Distinction, attending during the whole Ceremony.

Whereas it has pleased Almighty God, to call to His Mercy our late Sovereign Lord King George the Second, of Blessed Memory, by whose Decease the Imperial Crowns of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, are Solely and Rightfully come to the High and Mighty Prince George Prince of Wales; We therefore the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of the Realm, being here Assisted with those of His late Majesty's Privy Council, with numbers of other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, with the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of London, do now hereby, with one Voice and Consent of Tongue and Heart, publish and proclaim, That the High and Mighty Prince George Prince of Wales, is now, by the Death of our late Sovereign, of happy Memory, become Our only lawful and rightful Liege Lord George the Third, by the Grace of God, King of Great Britain, France, and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, and so forth: To whom we do acknowledge all Faith and constant Obedience, with all hearty and humble Affection, Beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do Reign, to Bless the Royal Prince George the Third with long and happy Years to Reign over us.

Given at the Court at Carleton House, this Twenty Fifth Day of October, 1760.

GOD Save the KING.


George IV (1820)


(Source: The Times, Feb. 1, 1820; quoting the London Gazette Extraordinary, Jan 31, 1820).

Whitehall, Jan. 31.  On Saturday afternoon, at 35 minutes past 8 o'clock, our late Most Gracious Sovereign King George the Third, whose strength had gradually declined for some weeks, expired without the least apparent suffering, at his Castle of Windsor, in the 82d year of his age and the 60th of his reign.  No Sovereign ever possessed in a higher degree the veneration and affection of his subjects, and their grief for his loss is only abated by the unhappy malady which has precluded his Majesty from directing the measures of his Government during the 9 latter years of his glorious reign.
Upon the news of this melancholy event arriving in London, the Lords of the Privy Council assembled yesterday at Carlton-house, and gave orders for proclaiming his present Majesty, who made a most gracious declaration to them, and caused all the Lords and others of the late King's Privy Council, who were then present, to be sworn of his Majesty's Privy Council.
And this day, about noon, his Majesty was proclaimed, first before Carlton-house, where the Officers of State, Nobility, and Privy Counsellors were present, with the Officers of Arms, all being on foot.  Then the Officers, being mounted on horseback, the like was done at Charing-cross, within Temple-bar, at the end of Wood-street, in Cheapside, and lastly at the Royal Exchange, with the usual solemnities; the principal officers of State, a great number of the nobility, and of other persons of dfistinction, attending during the whole ceremony.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to his mercy our late Sovereign Lord King George the Third, of blessed memory, by whose decease the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland is solely and rightfully come to the high and mighty Prince George, Prince of Wales; we, therefore, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being here assisted with those of his late Majesty's Privy Council, with numbers of other principal gentlemen of quality, with the Lord-Mayor, Aldermen, and citizens of London, do now hereby, with one voice and consent of tongue and heart, publish and proclaim, that the high and mighty Prince George, Prince of Wales, is now, by the death of our late Sovereign, of happy memory, become our only lawful and rightful Liege Lord George the Fourth, by the Grace of God, King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Defender of the Faith. To whom we do acknowledge all faith and constant obedience, with all hearty and humble affection, beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do reign, to bless the Royal Prince George the Fourth with long and happy years to reign over us.

Given at the Court at Carlton-house, this thirtieth day of January, one thousand eight hundred and twenty.

GOD SAVE THE KING.


William IV (1830)

(Source: The Times, June 28, 1830; quoting The London Gazette Extraordinary, June 27, 1830).

Whitehall, June 27.  On Saturday morning, at 15 minutes past 3 o'clock, our late Most Gracious Sovereign King George the Fourth, who had suffered from severe indisposition for some weeks, expired without the apparent pain,  in the 68th year of his age, and 11th of his reign.  The intelligence of His Majesty's decease caused the deepest affliction to his faithful and loyal subkects, to whom he was endeared by the virtues which adorned his character, and by the anxious degree which His Majesty had uniformly manifested to promote the welfare of his people.
Upon the news of this melancholy event arriving in London, the Lords of the Privy Council assembled yesterday at St. James's Palace, and gave orders for proclaiming his present Majesty, who made a most gracious declaration to them, and caused all the Lords and others of the late King's Privy Council, who were then present, to be sworn of his Majesty's Privy Council.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to his mercy our late Sovereign Lord King George the Fourth, of blessed memory, by whose decease the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland is solely and rightfully come to the High and Mighty Prince William Henry, Duke of Clarence and St. Andrew's, and Earl of Munster; we, therefore, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being here assisted with those of his late Majesty's Privy Council, with numbers of other principal gentlemen of quality, with the Lord-Mayor, Aldermen, and citizens of London, do now hereby, with one voice and consent of tongue and heart, publish and proclaim, that the High and Mighty Prince William Henry, Duke of Clarence and St. Andrew's, and Earl of Munster, is now, by the death of our late Sovereign, of happy memory, become our only lawful and rightful Liege Lord William the Fourth, by the Grace of God, King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Defender of the Faith. To whom we do acknowledge all faith and constant obedience, with all hearty and humble affection, beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do reign, to bless the Royal Prince, William the Fourth, with long and happy years to reign over us.

Given at the Court of St. James's, this 26th day of June, 1830.

GOD save the KING.


Victoria (1837)

(Source: The Times, June 21, 1837; quoting the supplement to The London Gazette, June 20, 1837).

Whitehall, June 20.  On Tuesday morning, June 20th inst., at 12 minutes past 2 o'clock, our late most gracious Sovereign King William IV expired at his Castle of Windsor, in the 72d year of his age, and the seventh of his reign.  This event has caused one universal feeling of regret and sorrow to his late Majesty's faithful and attached subjects, to whom he was endeared by the deep interest in their welfare which he invariably manifested, as well as by the manly virtues which marked and adorned his character.
Upon the intimation of this distressing event,  the Lords of the Privy Council assembled yesterday at Kensington Palace, and gave orders for proclaiming Her present Majesty, who made a most gracious declaration to them, and caused all the Lords and others of the late King's Privy Council, who were then present, to be sworn of Her Majesty's Privy Council.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to His mercy our late Sovereign Lord King William IV., of blessed and glorious memory, by whose decease the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland is solely and rightfully come to the high and mighty Princess Alexandrina Victoria, saving the rights of any issue of his late Majesty King William IV. which may be born of his late Majesty's consort—we, therefore, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being here assisted with these of his late Majesty's Privy Council, with numbers of other principal gentlemen of quality, with the Lord-Mayor, Aldermen, and citizens of London, do now hereby, with one voice and consent of tongue and heart, publish and proclaim, that the high and mighty Princess Alexandrina Victoria is now, by the death of our late Sovereign, of happy memory, become our only lawful and rightful Liege Lady Victoria, by the Grace of God, Queen of the united kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, saving as aforesaid. To whom, saving as aforesaid, we do acknowledge all faith and constant obedience, with all hearty and humble affection, beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do reign, to bless the Royal Princess Victoria with long and happy years to reign over us.

Given at the Court of Kensington, this 20th day of June, 1837.

God save the Queen.


Edward VII (1901)

(Source: The Times, January 24, 1901; quoting the supplement to The London Gazette, January 22, 1901).

Whitehall, January 23, 1901.  On Tuesday afternoon, the twenty-second of January instant, at half-past six o'clock, our late most gracious Sovereign Queen Victoria expired at Osborne House, Isle of Wight, in the eighty-second year of Her age, and the sixty-fourth year of Her reign.  This event has caused one universal feeling of regret and sorrow to Her  late Majesty's faithful and attached subjects, to whom She was endeared by the deep interest in their welfare which She invariably manifested, as well as by the signal virtues which marked and adorned Her character.
Upon the intimation of this distressing event,  the Lords of the Privy Council assembled this day at St. James's Palace, and gave orders for proclaiming His present Majesty, who made a most gracious declaration to them, and caused all the Lords and others of the late Queen's Privy Council, who were then present, to be sworn of His Majesty's Privy Council.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to His mercy our late Sovereign Lady Queen Victoria, of Blessed and Glorious Memory, by whose Decease the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland is solely and rightfully come to the High and Mighty Prince Albert Edward : We, therefore, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being here assisted with these of her late Majesty's Privy Council, with numbers of other principal gentlemen of quality, with the Lord-Mayor, Aldermen, and citizens of London, do now hereby, with one voice and consent of tongue and heart, publish and proclaim, That the High and Mighty Prince Albert Edward, is now, by the death of our late Sovereign, of happy memory, become our only lawful and rightful Liege Lord Edward the Seventh, by the Grace of God, King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India: To whom we do acknowledge all faith and constant obedience, with all hearty and humble affection, beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do reign, to bless the Royal Prince Edward the Seventh, with long and happy years to reign over us.

Given at the Court at St. James's, the twenty-third day of January, in this year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and one.


George V (1910)

(Source: The Times, May 9, 1910; quoting the supplement to The London Gazette Extraordinary).

Whitehall, May 7, 1910.  On Friday night, the sixth of May instant, at a quarter to twelve o'clock, our late most gracious Sovereign King Edward the Seventh expired at Buckingham Palace in the sixtyninth year of His age, and the tenth of His reign.  This event has caused one universal feeling of regret and sorrow to His  late Majesty's faithful and attached subjects, to whom He was endeared by the deep interest in their welfare which He invariably manifested, as well as by the eminent and impressive virtues which illustrated and adorned His character.
Upon the intimation of this distressing event,  the Lords of the Privy Council assembled this day at St. James's Palace, and gave orders for proclaiming His present Majesty, Who made a most Gracious Declaration to them, and caused all the Lords and others of the late King's Privy Council, who were then present, to be sworn of His Majesty's Privy Council.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to His mercy our late Sovereign Lord King Edward the Seventh, of Blessed and Glorious Memory, by whose Decease the Imperial Crown of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland is solely and rightfully come to the High and Mighty Prince George Frederick Ernest Albert : We, therefore, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being here assisted with these of His late Majesty's Privy Council, with numbers of other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, with the Lord-Mayor, Aldermen, and citizens of London, do now hereby, with one Voice and Consent of Tongue and Heart, publish and proclaim, That the High and Mighty Prince George Frederick Ernest Albert, is now, by the Death of our late Sovereign, of Happy Memory, become our only lawful and rightful Liege Lord George the Fifth, by the Grace of God, King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India: To whom we do acknowledge all Faith and constant Obedience, with all hearty and humble Affection: beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do reign, to bless the Royal Prince George the Fifth, with long and happy years to reign over Us.

Given at the Court at St. James's, this seventh day of May, in this year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and ten.
 


Edward VIII (1936)

(Source: The Times, January 23, 1936)

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to His mercy our late Sovereign Lord King George the Fifth, of Blessed and Glorious Memory, by whose Decease the Imperial Crown of Great Britain, Ireland, and all other His late Majesty's Dominions is solely and rightfully come to the High and Mighty Prince Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David : We, therefore, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being here assisted with these of His late Majesty's Privy Council, with numbers of other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, with the Lord-Mayor, Aldermen, and citizens of London, do now hereby, with one Voice and Consent of Tongue and Heart, publish and proclaim, That the High and Mighty Prince Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David, is now, by the Death of our late Sovereign of happy Memory, become our only lawful and rightful Liege Lord Edward the Eighth, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland, and the British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India: To whom we do acknowledge all Faith and constant Obedience, with all hearty and humble Affection: beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do reign, to bless the Royal Prince Edward the Eighth, with long and happy years to reign over Us.


George VI (1936)

(Source: The Times, December 14, 1936, citing the London Gazette Extraordinary)

Whitehall, December 12, 1936.  This day the Lords of the Privy Council assembled at St. James's Palace and gave orders for proclaiming His Majesty who made a Most Gracious Declaration to them.

Whereas by an Instrument of Abdication dated the Tenth day of December instant His former Majesty King Edward the Eighth did declare His irrevocable Determination to renounce the Throne for Himself and His Descendants, and the said Instrument of Abdication has now taken effect, whereby the Imperial Crown of Great Britain, Ireland, and all other His former Majesty's dominions is now solely and rightfully come to the High and Mighty Albert Frederick Arthur George : We, therefore, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being here assisted with these of His former Majesty's Privy Council, with numbers of other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, with the Lord-Mayor, Aldermen, and citizens of London, do now hereby, with one Voice and Consent of Tongue and Heart, publish and proclaim, That the High and Mighty PrinceAlbert Frederick Arthur George, is now become our only lawful and rightful Liege Lord George the Sixth by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, Ireland, and the British Dominions beyond the Seas King, Defender of the Faith, Emperor of India: To whom we do acknowledge all Faith and constant Obedience, with all hearty and humble Affection: beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do reign, to bless the Royal Prince George the Sixth, with long and happy years to reign over Us.

Given at St. James's Palace, this Twelfth day of December in the year of our Lord One thousand nine hundred and thirty-six.


Elizabeth II (1952)


Upon the intimation that our late Most Gracious Sovereign King George the Sixth had died in his sleep at Sandringham in the early hours of this morning  the Lords of the Privy Council assembled this day at St. James's Palace, and gave orders for proclaiming Her present Majesty.

Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God to call to His mercy our late Sovereign Lord King George the Sixth of Blessed and Glorious Memory by whose Decease the Crown is solely and rightfully come to the High and Mighty Princess Elizabeth Alexandra Mary : We, therefore, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal of this Realm, being here assisted with these of His late Majesty's Privy Council, with representatives of other members of the Commonwealth, with other Principal Gentlemen of Quality, with the Lord Mayor, Aldermen, and citizens of London, do now hereby with one Voice and Consent of Tongue and Heart publish and proclaim that the High and Mighty Princess Elizabeth Alexandra Mary is now, by the Death of our late Sovereign of happy Memory, become Queen Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God Queen of this Realm and of all Her other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith, to whom Her lieges do acknowledge all Faith and constant Obedience, with hearty and humble Affection: beseeching God, by whom Kings and Queens do reign, to bless the Royal Princess Elizabeth the Second with long and happy Years to reign over Us.

Given at St. James's Palace, this Sixth day of February in the year of our Lord One thousand nine hundred and fifty-two.


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