Napoleonic Succession Laws

Contents

Refer to Paul Theroff's Bonaparte entry in his Iternet Gotha for a genealogy of Napoleon and his brothers.

First Empire (1804-14 and 1815)

Napoléon Bonaparte (1769-1821) came to power by a military coup on Nov 10, 1799 (18 Brumaire 8 in the Republican calendar).  The regime he put in place was headed by three Consuls, and he was the First Consul.  He became Consul for Life in 1802, and then transformed the regime into a hereditary monarchy in 1804.

The French Senate voted a law (sénatus-consulte organique) on May 18, 1804 (the full text is available here).  It was in fact the constitution of the First Empire.  Title I established the empire:
"Art. 1. The government of the Republic is vested in an Emperor, who takes the title of Emperor of the French; justice is rendered in his name by the officials he appoints.
" Art. 2. Napoléon Bonaparte, currently First Consul of the French Republic, is Emperor of the French."
Title II dealt with "heredity" and it forms the basis of the succession law.  Title III dealt with the Imperial family, Title IV with the regency.

The throne was hereditary in Napoléon I's direct, legitimate and natural (ie., of the body) male line, excluding women and their issue (art. 3). Napoléon could adopt a son or grandson (aged 18 or more) of one of his brothers, if he had no children of his own. No other adoptions were allowed (Art. 4). In default of Napoléon's line (of the body or adoptive), the succession called Joseph and his line (art. 5), followed by Louis and his line (art. 6). Beyond that, the Grand Dignitaries of the Empire would submit a proposal to the Senate, to be approved by referendum, choosing a new emperor (art. 7).  Princes were forbidden from marrying without prior consent, on pain of losing their succession rights and excluding their issue; but if the marriage ended without children, the prince would recover his rights (art. 12).  Napoléon was authorized to set special rules for the Imperial family (art. 14).

The law was proclaimed on May 20, 1804. No contradiction was seen between France being a Republic and it being governed by an Emperor. Indeed, until 1809, French coins bore "République Française" on one side and "Napoléon Empereur" on the other, pursuant to a decree of June 26, 1804; the legend on the reverse was replaced by "Empire français" by decree of October 22, 1808). This was a return to the Roman use of the word Emperor (Augustus was officially only the first citizen of the Roman Republic).

The very last article of the law  (art. 142) mandated that the following statement would be submitted for approval through a referendum:  "The people want the imperial dignity to be hereditary in the direct, natural, legitimate and adoptive line of Napoléon Bonaparte and in the direct, natural and legitimate line of Joseph Bonaparte and Louis Bonaparte, as provided by the law of this day."   Note that the establishment of the Empire and of Napoléon as Emperor was not subject to popular approval.

A decree of March 30, 1806 defined the status of the imperial family, pursuant to art. 14 of the constitution.  The imperial family was composed of (1) the princes apt to succeed as defined by the Constitution, their spouses and their descendance in legitimate marriage, (2) the sisters of Napoléon, their spouses and their descendants in legitimate marriage to the 5th generation included, (3) the adopted children of the Emperor and their legitimate descent. The decree laid down many rules on the behavior of the members of the family; the most predictable one was that formal written assent from the Emperor (in a closed letter sealed by the Chancelor) was required for any marriage to be legally valid; in the absence of consent, the marriage was null and void and any descent was illegitimate. Many other rules were also set down: the Emperor could exile members of his family, or exile people whose influence he disapproved of; he decided on their education, where they lived, etc.

Napoléon's official style was: "Napoléon, par la grâce de Dieu et les Constitutions de la République, Empereur des Français". Several other titles were added: "Roi d'Italie" (1805), "Protecteur de la Confédération du Rhin"(1806), "Médiateur de la Confédération Helvétique"(1809).

End of the First Empire

On April 1, 1814, the victorious Allied troups occupied Paris, and Czar Alexander I of Russia issued a proclamation to the effect that the Allies would respect the constitution that France would choose for itself, but that they would not deal with Napoléon or any member of his family. The Senate met the next day and proclaimed: "Napoléon Bonaparte est déchu du trône et le droit d'hérédité établi dans sa famille est aboli." (Napoléon Bonaparte is deprived of the throne and the hereditary right thereto established in his family is abolished).  The next day, the Corps Législatif signalled its agreement: "Le Corps Législatif [...] reconnaît et déclare la déchéance de Napoléon Bonaparte et des membres de sa famille."

Napoléon himself formally renounced the thrones of France and Italy "for himself and his posterity" on April 11, 1814. This renunciation was enshrined in a formal treaty between himself on one hand, Russia, Austria and Prussia on the other hand, signed at Fontainebleau on the same day. Great Britain acceded to the treaty of Fontainebleau on 27 April, the Provisional Government of France accepted it on April 11, and an official note by Louis XVIII's minister of foreign affairs of 30 May indicated the king's intention to abide the terms of the treaty. Thus, Napoléon's renunciation was an act of international law. The treaty gave him sovereignty over Elba, and gave Parma, Piacenza and Guastalla as hereditary domain for his wife and their son. It also made other arrangements for Bonaparte family members.

He was exiled to the island of Elba, off the coast of Italy. But he later returned to France. Upon landing at Golfe-Juan, on March 1, 1815, he resumed the imperial dignity and amended the constitution by an "Additional Act" of Apr 22, 1815 (nothing in the succession laws was modified, however). The defeat at Waterloo on June 18 left him with no choice but to abdicate, this time in favor of his son Napoléon II. On July 1, 1815 the Bourbons returned to Paris and put an end to "les Cent Jours".

Texts


Sénatus-Consulte organique du 28 Floréal an XII (18 mai 1804)

TITRE PREMIER

ART. 1ER. - Le Gouvernement de la République est confié à un Empereur, qui prend le titre d'Empereur des Français. - La justice se rend, au nom de l'Empereur, par les officiers qu'il institue.

ART. 2. - Napoléon Bonaparte, Premier consul actuel de la République, est Empereur des Français.

TITRE II    De l'hérédité

ART. 3. - La dignité impériale est héréditaire dans la descendance directe, naturelle et légitime de Napoléon Bonaparte, de mâle en mâle, par ordre de primogéniture, et à l'exclusion perpétuelle des femmes et de leur descendance.

ART. 4. - Napoléon Bonaparte peut adopter les enfants ou petits-enfants de ses frères, pourvu qu'ils aient atteint l'âge de dix-huit ans accomplis, et que lui-même n'ait point d'enfants mâles au moment de l'adoption. - Ses fils adoptifs entrent dans la ligne de sa descendance directe. - Si, postérieurement à l'adoption, il lui survient des enfants mâles, ses fils adoptifs ne peuvent être appelés qu'après les descendants naturels et légitimes. - L'adoption est interdite aux successeurs de Napoléon Bonaparte et à leurs descendants.

ART. 5. - A défaut d'héritier naturel et légitime ou d'héritier adoptif de Napoléon Bonaparte, la dignité impériale est dévolue et déférée à Joseph Bonaparte et à ses descendants naturels et légitimes, par ordre de primogéniture, et de mâle en mâle, à l'exclusion perpétuelle des femmes et de leur descendance.

ART. 6. - A défaut de Joseph Bonaparte et de ses descendants mâles, la dignité impériale est dévolue et déférée à Louis Bonaparte et à ses descendants naturels et légitimes, par ordre de primogéniture, et de mâle en mâle, à l'exclusion perpétuelle des femmes et de leur descendance.

ART. 7. - A défaut d'héritier naturel et légitime et d'héritier adoptif de Napoléon Bonaparte ; - A défaut d'héritiers naturels et légitimes de Joseph Bonaparte et de ses descendants mâles ; - De Louis Bonaparte et de ses descendants mâles ; - Un sénatus-consulte organique, proposé au Sénat par les titulaires des grandes dignités de l'Empire, et soumis à l'acceptation du peuple, nomme l'Empereur, et règle dans sa famille l'ordre de l'hérédité, de mâle en mâle, à l'exclusion perpétuelle des femmes et de leur descendance.

ART. 8. - Jusqu'au moment où l'élection du nouvel Empereur est consommée, les affaires de l'Etat sont gouvernées par les ministres, qui se forment en conseil de gouvernement, et qui délibèrent à la majorité des voix. Le secrétaire d'Etat tient le registre des délibérations.

TITRE III  De la famille impériale

ART. 9. - Les membres de la famille impériale, dans l'ordre de l'hérédité, portent le titre de Princes français. - Le fils aîné de l'Empereur porte celui de Prince impérial.

ART. 10. - Un sénatus-consulte règle le mode de l'éducation des princes français.

ART. 11. - Ils sont membres du Sénat et du Conseil d'Etat, lorsqu'ils ont atteint leur dix-huitième année.

ART. 12. - Ils ne peuvent se marier sans l'autorisation de l'Empereur. - Le mariage d'un prince Français, fait sans l'autorisation de l'Empereur, emporte privation de tout droit à l'hérédité, tant pour celui qui l'a contracté que pour ses descendants. - Néanmoins, s'il n'existe point d'enfant de ce mariage, et qu'il vienne à se dissoudre, le prince qui l'avait contracté recouvre ses droits à l'hérédité.

ART. 13. - Les actes qui constatent la naissance, les mariages et les décès des membres de la famille impériale, sont transmis sur un ordre de l'Empereur, au Sénat, qui en ordonne la transcription sur ses registres et le dépôt dans ses archives.

ART. 14. - Napoléon Bonaparte établit par des statuts auxquels ses successeurs sont tenus de se conformer, - 1° Les devoirs des individus de tout sexe, membres de la famille impériale, envers l'Empereur ; - 2° Une organisation du palais impérial conforme à la dignité du trône et à la grandeur de la nation.

ART. 15. - La liste civile reste réglée ainsi qu'elle l'a été par les articles 1 et 4 du décret du 16 mai 1791. - Les princes français Joseph et Louis Bonaparte, et à l'avenir les fils puînés naturels et légitimes de l'Empereur, seront traités conformément aux articles 1, 10, 11, 12 et 13 du décret du 21 décembre 1790. - L'Empereur pourra fixer le douaire de l'impératrice et l'assigner sur la liste civile ; ses successeurs ne pourront rien changer aux dispositions qu'il aura faites à cet égard.

ART. 16. - L'Empereur visite les départements : en conséquence, des palais impériaux sont établis aux quatre points principaux de l'Empire. - Ces palais sont désignés et leurs dépendances déterminées par une loi.


Statut Constitutionnel du 30 mars 1806

Second Empire (1852-70)

On December 2, 1851, Napoléon I's nephew Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte, president of the French Republic, took power by force and dissolved the National Assembly. A referendum of December 20 gave him full powers to draft a constitution based on the principles that he set forth in a proclamation during his coup.  Consequently, a constitution was published on January 14, 1852, which made him president for 10 years.   Then, a law (sénatus-consulte) of November 7, 1852 restored "the imperial dignity," vested it in Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte, and made it hereditary in his direct legitimate descent, by male primogeniture. The restoration of the Empire, the choice of Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte, and the hereditary rights of his issue and his power to further set the order of succession in the Bonaparte family, were all submitted to approval by referendum, on November 21 and 22.  The results were published on December 2, 1852, and the president became Napoléon III.

The law of succession was very similar to that of the First Empire.  The throne was hereditary in Napoléon III's male legitimate line by primogeniture (art. 2).  Napoléon III was allowed to adopt a son from among the descent of the brothers of Napoléon I, but this ability was denied to any successor (art. 3). Contrary to the 1804 constitution, the 1852 constitution did not name the collateral branches that were allowed to succeed.  Instead, power was given to Napoléon III to set the order of succession within the Bonaparte family in default of his natural or adopted line (art. 4).  This was done by an organic decree of December 18, 1852 naming Jérôme Napoléon and the direct legitimate male issue of his marriage with Catherine of Wurttemberg as collateral successors after the Emperor's descent (in the 1870 version of the constitution, the prince Napoléon and his issue are named).  In the absence of any heirs, the cabinet joined by the presidents of the Senate, House and Council of State proposed to the Senate a new emperor, subject to approval by referendum (art. 5). Princes marrying without consent lost their rights and their issue was excluded, unless the offending prince was widowed without children, in which case he recovered his rights.  The imperial family was subject to a special statute (art. 6).  That statute, enacted on June 21, 1853, reestablished most of Napoléon's rules for the imperial family, defined as the legitimate or adoptive descent of the emperor, and the other princes with succession rights, their spouses and legitimate descent.

Various reforms made over the years were consolidated in a single document submitted to a referendum and published on May 21, 1870.  It did not substantially change the succession laws.  A few months later, on September 4, 1870, the Second Empire was abolished in Paris after the disasters of the Franco-Prussian war and the capture of the Emperor by the Prussian armies in Sedan.

Napoleon III's style was "Napoléon, par la grâce de Dieu et la volonté nationale, Empereur des Français".

Texts

Sénatus-consulte du 7 novembre 1852, portant modification à la Constitution

ARTICLE PREMIER. - La dignité impériale est rétablie. - Louis Napoléon Bonaparte est Empereur des Français, sous le nom de Napoléon III.

ART. 2. - La dignité impériale est héréditaire dans la descendance directe et légitime de Louis Napoléon Bonaparte, de mâle en mâle, par ordre de primogéniture, et à l'exclusion perpétuelle des femmes et de leur descendance.

ART. 3. - Louis Napoléon Bonaparte, s'il n'a pas d'enfants mâles, peut adopter les enfants et descendants légitimes, dans la ligne masculine des frères de l'Empereur Napoléon Ier. - Les formes de l'adoption sont réglées par un sénatus-consulte. - Si, postérieurement à l'adoption, il survient à Louis Napoléon des enfants mâles, ses fils adoptifs ne pourront être appelés à lui succéder qu'après ses descendants légitimes. - L'adoption est interdite aux successeurs de Louis Napoléon et à leur descendance.

ART. 4. - Louis Napoléon Bonaparte règle, par un décret organique adressé au Sénat et déposé dans ses archives, l'ordre de succession au trône dans la famille Bonaparte, pour le cas où il ne laisserait aucun héritier direct, légitime ou adoptif.

ART. 5. - A défaut d'héritier légitime ou d'héritier adoptif de Louis Napoléon Bonaparte, et des successeurs en ligne collatérale qui prendront leur droit dans le décret organique sus-mentionné, un sénatus-consulte proposé au Sénat par les ministres formés en Conseil de gouvernement, avec l'adjonction des présidents en exercice du Sénat, du Corps législatif et du Conseil d'Etat, et soumis à l'acceptation du Peuple, nomme l'Empereur et règle dans sa famille l'ordre héréditaire de mâle en mâle, à l'exclusion perpétuelle des femmes et de leur descendance. - Jusqu'au moment où l'élection du nouvel empereur est consommée, les affaires de l'Etat sont gouvernées par les ministres en fonctions, qui se forment en Conseil de gouvernement et délibèrent à la majorité des voix.

ART. 6. - Les membres de la famille de Louis Napoléon Bonaparte appelés éventuellement à l'hérédité, et leur descendance des deux sexes, font partie de la famille impériale. Un sénatus-consulte règle leur position. Ils ne peuvent se marier sans l'autorisation de l'Empereur. Leur mariage fait sans cette autorisation emporte privation de tout droit à l'hérédité, tant pour celui qui l'a contracté que pour ses descendants. - Néanmoins, s'il n'existe pas d'enfants de ce mariage, en cas de dissolution pour cause de décès, le prince qui l'aurait contracté recouvre ses droits à l'hérédité. - Louis Napoléon Bonaparte fixe les titres et la condition des autres membres de sa famille. - L'empereur a pleine autorité sur tous les membres de sa famille ; il règle leurs devoirs et leurs obligations par des statuts qui ont force de loi.

ART. 7. - La Constitution du 14 janvier 1852 est maintenue dans toutes celles de ses dispositions qui ne sont pas contraires au présent sénatus-consulte ; il ne pourra y être apporté de modifications que dans les formes et par les moyens qu'elle a prévus.

ART. 8. - La proposition suivante sera présentée à l'acceptation du Peuple français dans les formes déterminées par les décrets des 2 et 4 décembre 1851 :
" Le Peuple français veut le rétablissement de la dignité impériale dans la personne de Louis Napoléon Bonaparte, avec hérédité dans sa descendance directe, légitime ou adoptive, et lui donne le droit de régler l'ordre de succession au trône dans la famille Bonaparte, ainsi qu'il est prévu par le sénatus-consulte du 7 novembre 1852. "


Decree of 18 December 1852


18 DECEMBRE 1852. Décret organique qui règle, conformément à l'art. 4 du sénatrus-consulte du 7 novembre 1852, l'ordre de succession au trône dans la famille Bonaparte. (XI, Bull. VI, n. 33.)

Napoléon, etc. vu l'art. 4 du sénatus-consulte du 7 novembre, ratifié par le plébiscite des 21 et 22 du même mois, aux termes desquels il nous appartient de régler, par un décret organique, adressé au Sénat, l'ordre de succession au trône dans la famille Bonaparte, pour le cas où nous ne laisserions aucun héritier direct, légitime ou adoptif; tout en espérant qu'il nous sera donné de réaliser les voeux du pays et de contracter, sous la protection divine, une alliance qui nous permette de laisser des héritiers directs; ne voulant pas, néanmoins, que le trône, relevé par la grâce de Dieu et la volonté nationale, puisse vaquer, par défaut d'un successeur désigné par nous, avons décrété et décrétons ce qui suit:

Art. 1er. Dans le cas où nous ne laisserions aucun héritier direct, légitime ou adoptif, notre oncle bien-aimé Jérôme-Napoléon Bonaparte, et sa descendance directe, naturelle et légitime, provenant de son mariage avec la princesse Catherine de Wurtemberg, de mâle en mâle, par ordre de primogéniture, et à l'exclusion perpétuelle des femmes, sont appelés à nous succéder.

2. Le présent décret, revêtu du sceau de l'État, sera porté au Sénat par notre ministre d'État pour être déposé dans ses archives.


Sénatus-consulte du 21 mai 1870, fixant la Constitution de l'Empire

TITRE II  De la dignité impériale et de la régence

ART. 2. - La dignité impériale, rétablie dans la personne de Napoléon III par le plébiscite des 21-22 novembre 1852, est héréditaire dans la descendance directe et légitime de Louis Napoléon Bonaparte, de mâle en mâle, par ordre de primogéniture, et à l'exclusion perpétuelle des femmes et de leur descendance.

ART. 3. - Napoléon III, s'il n'a pas d'enfant mâle, peut adopter les enfants et descendants légitimes dans la ligne masculine des frères de l'empereur Napoléon 1er. - Les formes de l'adoption sont réglées par une loi. - Si, postérieurement à l'adoption, il survient à Napoléon III des enfants mâles, ses fils adoptifs ne pourront être appelés à lui succéder qu'après ses descendants légitimes. - L'adoption est interdite aux successeurs de Napoléon III et à leur descendance.

ART. 4. - A défaut d'héritier légitime direct ou adoptif, sont appelés au trône le prince Napoléon (Joseph Charles Paul) et sa descendance directe et légitime, de mâle en mâle, par ordre de primogéniture, et à l'exclusion perpétuelle des femmes et de leur descendance.

ART. 5. - A défaut d'héritier légitime ou d'héritier adoptif de Napoléon III et des successeurs en ligne collatérale qui prennent leurs droits dans l'article précédent, le Peuple nomme l'empereur et règle, dans sa famille, l'ordre héréditaire, de mâle en mâle, à l'exclusion perpétuelle des femmes et de leur descendance. - Le projet de plébiscite est successivement délibéré par le Sénat et par le Corps législatif, sur la proposition des ministres formés en Conseil de gouvernement. - Jusqu'au moment où l'élection du nouvel empereur est consommée, les affaires de l'Etat sont gouvernées par les ministres en fonctions, qui se forment en Conseil de gouvernement et délibèrent à la majorité des voix.

ART. 6. - Les membres de la famille de Napoléon III appelés éventuellement à l'hérédité et leur descendance des deux sexes font partie de la famille impériale. - Ils ne peuvent se marier sans l'autorisation de l'empereur. Le mariage fait sans cette autorisation emporte privation de tout droit à l'hérédité, tant pour celui qui l'a contracté que pour ses descendants. - Néanmoins, s'il n'existe pas d'enfants de ce mariage, en cas de dissolution pour cause de décès, le prince qui l'aurait contracté recouvre ses droits à l'hérédité. - L'empereur fixe les titres et les conditions des autres membres de sa famille. - Il a pleine autorité sur eux ; il règle leurs devoirs et leurs droits par des statuts qui ont force de loi.

ART. 7. - La régence de l'Empire est réglée par le sénatus-consulte du 17 juillet 1856.

ART. 8. - Les membres de la famille impériale appelés éventuellement à l'hérédité prennent le titre de princes français. - Le fils aîné de l'empereur porte le titre de prince impérial

ART. 9. - Les princes français sont membres du Sénat et du Conseil d'Etat quand ils ont atteint l'âge de dix-huit ans accomplis. Ils ne peuvent y siéger qu'avec l'agrément de l'empereur.


Royalty Main Page | Search Heraldica | Heraldic Glossary | Contact

François Velde

Last Modified: Sep 15, 2000